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February is Black History Month


Assisted living ; Help with my aging loved ones; Aging adults; Nursing home; Senior living; Memory care; Alzheimer’s; Dementia; senior care; elder care; aging care; GCM; care manager; Geriatric care; Aging life care
Assisted living ; Help with my aging loved ones; Aging adults; Nursing home; Senior living; Memory care; Alzheimer’s; Dementia; senior care; elder care; aging care; GCM; care manager; Geriatric care; Aging life care

Genson Geriatrics Management provides oversight and management of older adults.  We are a non-medical practice – meaning we don’t diagnose, prescribe, or treat.  However, it’s important that, as clinicians, we know what conditions to look for in the population we serve.


Health disparities can exist among different racial and ethnic groups, and these disparities are influenced by various factors such as genetics, socio-economic status, access to healthcare, and environmental factors. While it's important to note that individual health can vary widely, some age-related illnesses may disproportionately affect African Americans compared to whites.


However, it's crucial to approach these generalizations with caution, as individual experiences can differ, and these disparities are complex and multifaceted. Here are a few examples:


1.     Hypertension (High Blood Pressure): African Americans tend to develop high blood pressure more often and at an earlier age than whites. It is a significant risk factor for heart disease and stroke.

2.     Type 2 Diabetes: African Americans have a higher prevalence of type 2 diabetes compared to whites. Diabetes can lead to various complications, including cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, and nerve damage.

3.     Prostate Cancer: African American men have a higher incidence of prostate cancer and are more likely to be diagnosed at an advanced stage. Prostate cancer tends to be more aggressive in this population.

4.     Breast Cancer: While overall incidence is higher in white women, African American women are more likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer at a younger age and have a higher mortality rate.

5.     Stroke: African Americans have a higher risk of stroke than whites, and strokes can be more severe and result in higher mortality rates.

6.     Alzheimer's Disease: Some studies suggest that African Americans may have a higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease compared to whites. However, research in this area is ongoing.


It's essential to address these health disparities by promoting awareness, improving access to healthcare, addressing socio-economic factors, and conducting further research to better understand the underlying causes. Additionally, personalized healthcare that considers individual differences is crucial for effective prevention and management of these conditions.


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